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and congressional leaders met to talk about how to avoid the fiscal cliff. the automatic spending cuts and tack increases that begin to kick in if there's no agreement by january 1st. 16 days to get here. >> i think we're far apart still, but i think we're moving closer together. >> i would say we're nowhere, period. we're nowhere. >> reporter: thursday treasury secretary timothy geithner proposed president obama's plan which included $1.6 trillion in tax revenue coming largely from an expiration of bush era tax cuts for families who make more than $250,000 a year. geithner says that's a must. >> there's not going to be an agreement without rates going up. >> reporter: the administration's plan also included $50 billion in new stimulus spending. boehner says the entire proposal represented three weeks of wasted time. >> i was just flabbergasted. i looked at him and said you can't be serious. >> reporter: the house speaker says republicans have put increased revenues, including efforts to close tax loopholes and reform the tax code, on the table instead of raising tax rates for anyone. >> the fa
is the federal government spending under control. we continue to get closer to this incredible fiscal cliff and i think that the president should take a case study analysis and look at what president coolidge did and jfk, john f. kennedy when they went in and lowered tax rates and increased revenues, which is exactly what we're talking about. >> so either you've got a president who is tremendously overconfident after being reelected or someone who asks for the sty in the first offer knowing that he will look like the compromising once he gives in on the demands and gets himself involved in negotiations. >> both sides are waiting to see who is going to offer up the plan first, we're waiting on the white house. >> it's the president's job, isn't it? congress controls the purse strings and the white house is waiting for-- we're waiting for something from congress on their side and go back and forth, who puts up the offer first and it's the first salvo, so, michigan mcconnell laughs at it and timothy geithner hands it to them. this isn't real. >> i didn't know that first was the first offer. we have
of the fiscal cliff negotiations. the mortgage interest deduction. government spending on this will reach $100 million by 2014, making it the third largest tax break on the books. who does it help? 41 million people. the most recent irs data showed that 41 million people claimed this deduction on their 2010 tax returns. the tax policy center says it tends to benefit upper middle class families the most. these bars show income in the circles the average savings. for those with incomes of less than $40,000 a year, their savings is $91, look at the people who make $250,000 and more. their average savings is about $5500. this benefits people most on both coasts and cities like chicago, with higher property prices, and we watch the fiscal cliff negotiations closely for what could happen next to this tax goody next year. >> here's the question i'm hearing people ask, if we go off the cliff here, how big a hit will we take on taxs? stand by, because i'm about to give you the closest answer i possibly can. to help me with that is laurie montgomery, she is the fiscal policy reporter for the washington
are headed here to washington today to tell president obama their thoughts on the fiscal cliff. the bipartisan group says both sides need to work together to avoid the tax increases and spending cuts due to kick in at the end of the year. >> no one's going to get what they want, but as a country to move forward, we've got to figure out who gives where, and if everything is going to be out on the table, how do we negotiate that? >> reporter: republicans have given a counterproposal to the president's plan which he issued last week. they say their plan would cut $2.2 trillion from the federal deficit over ten years. with $600 billion in health care cuts, $300 billion in cuts to mandatory spending and another $300 billion in cuts to other federal spending. the biggest difference between the republican plan and the president's remains taxes and how the government can generate more revenue to pay down the debt. >> rates have to rise on the top 2%. there's no other way to do it. >> reporter: president obama says his plan will raise taxes on the rich, bringing in $1.6 trillion. republ
is assuming unprecedented power to spend taxpayer dollars without any limit at all. >> even as the fiscal cliff negotiations drag on in washington, wall street seems to be basically unphased. the dow jones has slipped only about 200 points since the election. why isn't wall street more on edge itself? william cohen is the author of "money and power, hold goldman sachs came to rule the world." the labor department came out with the applications for unemployment aid saying it fell sharply for the last week and stocks basically opened flat this morning as we've seen. some of that has to do more with europe than it does with washington. but what is your reasoning for why wall street hasn't displayed more of an impact from this fiscal cliff nonsense? >> thomas, what wall street hates most of all is uncertainty and it's counterintuitive, there's actually plenty of certainty now. what's going to be certain is taxes are going up. either we go off the cliff or the curb and then taxes rise for everybody and then maybe they get repealed for the middle class and others or we reach a deal and taxes go
to go over the fiscal cliff. there will be some sort of resolution. they'll come up with some tax cuts, some breaks in spending, and probably kick the can down the road on a lot of it. i love the way this market is acting. it's not selling off with all the bad news, all the bickering, all the bad words on each side. you've got to love the way that this market is holding up here. doesn't mean investors need to be carefree, but overall, it looks like the market is setting up with a lot of negative sentiment out there. looks like there's a lot of opportunity for a big run higher once we get some form of resolution. i really believe we're going to get it. >> you think by year end? >> i really do. i think they want to go home for christmas. they're not going to want to not go home for christmas. you can always count on politicians to do the right thing when all other options have been exploited. they're going to finally get there because they have to. they're not going to solve 100% of it right away. >> jump in, abbigail. >> i think it's too early to be bearish or bullish, for that matter.
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)